FREQUENTY ASKED QUESTIONS

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Do not hesitate to contact us via email at contact@hyl.io or by phone at 1-877-495-4669 with any additional questions or concerns that you may have.

Product FAQ

AG-130

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Where can I purchase the AG-130?

Follow this link to purchase the Hylio AG-130 crop spraying UAS.

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What is the work efficiency of the AG-130?

The area per hour efficiency of the AG-130 is dependent on the dosage you are applying at. At a 1 gallon/acre (9.4 liters/hectare) rate, you can typically cover up to 50 acres (20.2 hectares) per hour; this rate includes downtime between flights.

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What is the spray width of the AG-130

The AG-130 can effectively spray up to 35 feet (10.7 meter) swaths. This swath width adjusts based on a variety of factors; check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the factors that affect swath width.

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How long is the downtime between flights?

When working with the AG-130, you will usually be swapping batteries and replacing the payload in-between every flight. In total, you could expect 30 to 60 seconds on the ground between flights.

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What is the flow rate of the AG-130?

The standard configuration of the AG-130 is capable of spraying at a max flow rate of 2.0 gallons/minute (7.6 liters/minute) utilizing GreenLeaf Airmix TipGuard nozzle tips (AMTGST 015).

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What type of batteries does the AG-130 use?

The AG-130 operates off of a 12s (or 44.4V) nominal voltage. In flight, The AG-130 utilizes a pair of 16.0 Amp 12S (44.4V) LiPo batteries which are designed to stand up to repeated, daily use. Each of these batteries weighs 10.3 pounds (4.67 kilograms).

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How do I charge the batteries?

Like all lithium-polymer batteries, the AG-130’s batteries require a LiPo battery charger unit. This charging unit requires an AC power source. Hylio’s charging unit is capable of charging one pair of batteries simultaneously (2 batteries in total). With multiple charging units, you can charge multiple sets of batteries at once.

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How long does it take to charge the batteries?

One pair of batteries will typically take approximate 25-30 minutes to charge. Note that this is dependent on a variety of factors including voltage and capacity of the power source, temperature, and level of discharge.

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What is the flight-time of the AG-130?

Flight-time of the AG-130 is dependent on mission parameters, weather conditions, and several other factors. Typically you can expect 10 -15 minutes of mixed flight-time when taking off with a full payload and executing a standard treatment mission.

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Which types of nozzles can the AG-130 use?

The standard configuration of the AG-130 is equipped with a total of 16 nozzle frames secured onto carbon fiber rods located beneath four of the motors. These nozzle frames are compatible with any TeeJet-style nozzle tips. You can change nozzle types simply and quickly, by hand.

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Is there a spec sheet for the AG-130 that I can check out?

Yes. Here is a link to the AG-130 downloadable spec sheet in US customary units. Here is the spec sheet in metric units.

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What is the payload of the AG-130?

The AG-130 has two tanks capable of carrying 4.0 gallons (20.0 liters) of liquid product each, making up a total of 8.0 gallons (30 liters) The AG-130’s maximum thrust is 269.6 pounds (122.3 kilograms).

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How big is the AG-130?

The AG-130 has the following dimensions when its arms are locked in ready position: 81x81x35 inches (206x206x89 centimeters) The AG-130 can be folded for easier transportation, in this mode, its dimensions are: 44x44x35 inches (112x112x89 centimeters). Without batteries, the AG-130 weighs 65.0 pounds (29.5 kilograms).

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What rates would I apply using the AG-130?

Check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the optimal application rates to use with our AgroDrones.

AG-122

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Where can I purchase the AG-122?

Follow this link to purchase the Hylio AG-122 crop spraying UAS.

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What is the work efficiency of the AG-122?

The area per hour efficiency of the AG-122 is dependent on the dosage you are applying at. At a 1 gallon/acre (9.4 liters/hectare) rate, you can typically cover up to 35 acres (14.2 hectares) per hour; this rate includes downtime between flights.

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What is the spray width of the AG-122?

The AG-122 can effectively spray up to 30 feet (9.1 meter) swaths. This swath width adjusts based on a variety of factors; check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the factors that affect swath width.

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How long is the downtime between flights?

When working with the AG-122, you will usually be swapping batteries and replacing the payload in-between every flight. In total, you could expect 30 to 60 seconds on the ground between flights.

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What is the flow rate of the AG-122?

The standard configuration of the AG-122 is capable of spraying at a max flow rate of 2.0 gallons/minute (7.6 liters/minute) utilizing GreenLeaf Airmix TipGuard nozzle tips (AMTGST 015).

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What type of batteries does the AG-122 use?

The AG-122 operates off of a 12s (or 44.4V) nominal voltage. In flight, The AG-122 utilizes a pair of 16.0 Amp 12S (44.4V) LiPo batteries which are designed to stand up to repeated, daily use. Each of these batteries weighs 10.3 pounds (4.67 kilograms).

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How do I charge the batteries?

Like all lithium-polymer batteries, the AG-122’s batteries require a LiPo battery charger unit. This charging unit requires an AC power source. Hylio’s charging unit is capable of charging one pair of batteries simultaneously (2 batteries in total). With multiple charging units, you can charge multiple sets of batteries at once.

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How long does it take to charge the batteries?

One pair of batteries will typically take approximate 25-30 minutes to charge. Note that this is dependent on a variety of factors including voltage and capacity of the power source, temperature, and level of discharge.

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What is the flight-time of the AG-122?

Flight-time of the AG-122 is dependent on mission parameters, weather conditions, and several other factors. Typically you can expect 10 -15 minutes of mixed flight-time when taking off with a full payload and executing a standard treatment mission.

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Which types of nozzles can the AG-122 use?

The standard configuration of the AG-122 is equipped with a total of 16 nozzle frames secured onto carbon fiber rods located beneath four of the motors. These nozzle frames are compatible with any TeeJet-style nozzle tips. You can change nozzle types simply and quickly, by hand.

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Is there a spec sheet for the AG-122 that I can check out?

Yes. Here is a link to the AG-122 downloadable spec sheet in US customary units. Here is the spec sheet in metric units

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What is the payload of the AG-122?

The AG-122 has two tanks capable of carrying 2.6 gallons (10 liters) of liquid product each, making up a total of 5.2 gallons (20 liters) The AG-122’s maximum thrust is 269.6 pounds (122.3 kilograms).

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How big is the AG-122?

The AG-122 has the following dimensions when its arms are locked in ready position: 81x81x35 inches (206x206x89 centimeters) The AG-122 can be folded for easier transportation, in this mode, its dimensions are: 44x44x35 inches (112x112x89 centimeters). Without batteries, the AG-122 weighs 65.0 pounds (29.5 kilograms).

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What rates would I apply using the AG-122?

Check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the optimal application rates to use with our AgroDrones.

AG-116

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Where can I purchase the AG-116?

Follow this link to purchase a Hylio AG-116 crop spraying UAS.

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What is the work efficiency of the AG-116?

The area per hour efficiency of the AG-116 is dependent on the dosage you are applying at. At a 1 gallon/acre (9.4 liters/hectare) rate, you can typically cover 27.5 acres (11 hectares) per hour; this rate includes downtime between flights.

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What is the flow rate of the drone?

The standard configuration of the AG-116 is capable of spraying at a max flow rate of 1.0 gallons/minute (3.8 liters/minute) utilizing GreenLeaf Airmix TipGuard nozzle tips (AMTGST 015).

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How long does it take to charge the batteries?

One pair of batteries will typically take approximate 25-30 minutes to charge. Note that this is dependent on a variety of factors including voltage and capacity of the power source, temperature, and level of discharge.

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How big is this drone?

The AG-116 has the following dimensions when its arms are locked in ready position: 67x59x24 inches (170x150x61centimeters) The AG-116 can be folded for easier transportation, in this mode, its dimensions are: 35x42x24 inches ( 89x107x61 centimeters ). Without batteries, the AG-116 weighs 35.1 pounds (15.9 kilograms)

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What type of batteries does the drone use?

The AG-116 operates off of a 12s (or 44.4V) nominal voltage. In flight, the AG-116 utilizes a single 22.0 Amp 12S (44.4V) LiPo battery, which is designed to stand up to repeated, daily use. Each of these batteries weighs 13.4 pounds (6.1 kilograms).

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How do I charge the batteries?

Like all lithium-polymer batteries, the AG-116’s batteries require a LiPo battery charger unit. This charging unit requires an AC power source. Hylio’s charging unit is capable of charging one pair of batteries simultaneously (2 batteries in total). With multiple charging units, you can charge multiple sets of batteries at once.

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What is the flight-time of the drone?

Flight-time of the AG-116 is dependent on mission parameters, weather conditions, and several other factors. Typically you can expect 10 -15 minutes of mixed flight-time when taking off with a full payload and executing a standard treatment mission.

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How long is the downtime between flights?

When working with the AG-116, you will usually be swapping batteries and replacing the payload in-between every flight. In total, you could expect 30 to 60 seconds on the ground between flights.

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What is the payload of the drone?

The AG-116 has one tank capable of carrying 4.2 gallons (16 liters) of liquid product. The AG-116’s maximum thrust is 202.2 pounds (91.7 kilograms).

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Which types of nozzles do the drones use?

The standard configuration of the AG-116 is equipped with six nozzle frames secured onto carbon fiber rods. These nozzle frames are compatible with any Teejet nozzle tips. You can change nozzle types simply and quickly, by hand.

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What is the spray width of the drone?

The AG-116 can effectively spray up to 25 feet (7.6 meter) swaths. This swath width adjusts based on a variety of factors; check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the factors that affect swath width.

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What rates would I apply using the AG-116?

Check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the optimal application rates to use with our AgroDrones.

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Is there a spec sheet for the AG-116 that I can review?

Yes. Here is a link to the AG-116 downloadable spec sheet in US customary units. Here is the spec sheet in metric units.

AG-110

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Where can I purchase the AG-110?

Follow this link to purchase a Hylio AG-110 crop spraying UAS.

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What is the work efficiency of the AG-110?

The area per hour efficiency of the AG-110 is dependent on the dosage you are applying at. At a 1 gallon/acre (9.4 liters/hectare) rate, you can typically cover up to15 acres (6 hectares) per hour; this rate includes downtime between flights.

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What is the flow rate of the drone?

The standard configuration of the AG-11 is capable of spraying at a max flow rate of 1.0 gallons/minute (3.8 liters/minute) utilizing GreenLeaf Airmix TipGuard nozzle tips (AMTGST 015).

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How do I charge the batteries?

Like all lithium-polymer batteries, the AG-110’s batteries require a LiPo battery charger unit. This charging unit requires an AC power source. Hylio’s charging unit is capable of charging one pair of batteries simultaneously (2 batteries in total). With multiple charging units, you can charge multiple sets of batteries at once.

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Which types of nozzles do the drones use?

The standard configuration of the AG-110 is equipped with six nozzle frames secured onto carbon fiber rods. These nozzle frames are compatible with any Teejet nozzle tips. You can change nozzle types simply and quickly, by hand.

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How big is this drone?

The AG-110 has the following dimensions when its arms are locked in ready position: 46x46x24 inches (117x117x61centimeters) The AG-110 can be folded for easier transportation, in this mode, its dimensions are: 23x23x20 inches ( 58x58x51 centimeters ). Without batteries, the AG-110 weighs 23.0 pounds (10.4 kilograms)

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What is the spray width of the drone?

The AG-110 can effectively spray up to 20 feet (6.1 meter) swaths. This swath width adjusts based on a variety of factors; check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the factors that affect swath width.

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What type of batteries does the drone use?

The AG-110 operates off of a 12s (or 44.4V) nominal voltage. In flight, the AG-116 utilizes a single 16.0 Amp 12S (44.4V) LiPo battery, which is designed to stand up to repeated, daily use. Each of these batteries weighs 10.3 pounds (4.67 kilograms).

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How long does it take to charge the batteries?

One pair of batteries will typically take approximate 25-30 minutes to charge. Note that this is dependent on a variety of factors including voltage and capacity of the power source, temperature, and level of discharge.

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What is the flight-time of the drone?

Flight-time of the AG-110 is dependent on mission parameters, weather conditions, and several other factors. Typically you can expect 10 -15 minutes of mixed flight-time when taking off with a full payload and executing a standard treatment mission.

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How long is the downtime between flights?

When working with the AG-110, you will usually be swapping batteries and replacing the payload in-between every flight. In total, you could expect 30 to 60 seconds on the ground between flights.

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What is the payload of the drone?

The AG-110 has one tank capable of carrying 2.6 gallons (10 liters) of liquid product. The AG-110’s maximum thrust is 134.8 pounds (61.2 kilograms).

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What rates would I apply using the AG-110?

Check out the Applications tab of the FAQ to learn more about the optimal application rates to use with our AgroDrones.

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Is there a spec sheet for the AG-110 that I can review?

Yes. Here is a link to the AG-110 downloadable spec sheet in US customary units. Here is the spec sheet in metric units.

General Tech FAQ

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How many drones can I control at once?

Using Hylio’s unique mission control software, Agrosol, a single operator can command up to four AgroDrones from a single, central control device (laptop, tablet, etc.).

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How do I communicate with the drone(s)?

Agrosol, Hylio’s mission control software, is a Windows 10/11 compatible application. Any Windows 10/11 device that meets the benchmark stats can run Agrosol. We recommend using a laptop or tablet. This ground station will communicate with the UAS using a USB-powered, long-range radio telemetry modem. This modem operates between 902 and 928 MHz. Each UAS also comes with a hand-held transmitter-controller for manual control. This transmitter-controller operates on a 2.4 GHz frequency.

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What are the minimum computer specs necessary to run AgroSol Ground Control Software?

Operating System: Windows 10 or 11 (required)
Hard Drive: 120GB HDD (required).
SSD recommended.
RAM: 4GB (required), 8GB (recommended)
Ports: 1xUSB port.
Screen Resolution: 1080p (1920x1080)

*Requires Intel or AMD processor; not compatible with Apple products.

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Do Hylio’s drones have active obstacle avoidance?

Yes. Each of our UAS comes equipped with two obstacle detection radars; one forward facing and the other backward facing. Together, these sensors give the UAS a nearly 360 degree detection field. The operator has the option of turning the radar detection on or off. When on, the UAS will actively detect obstacles and pause the UAS if collision is imminent. This obstacle avoidance system is an excellent safety feature, but if possible, obstacles should also be marked beforehand in AgroSol in order to increase mission efficiency. When marked beforehand, the UAS will already know how to intelligently route around the obstacles and you won't need to readjust for obstacles mid-mission.

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What certifications/licenses do I need to spray with these drones?

The rules and regulations regarding crop-spraying using UAS are entirely dependent on the region you are operating in. If you plan on spraying in the United States, there are EPA and FAA regulations that you need to follow. If you are operating in other parts of the world, we recommend you check out your country’s UAS regulations and agricultural regulations before proceeding with any spray operations.

Please view our FAA Licensing page to learn more about the regulations involved in utilizing our AgroDrones.

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Can I fly the drone manually?

Yes, the UAS comes with a hand held transmitter-controller that can be used to control the UAS manually. In this mode, you will have direct control of the throttle, pitch, yaw, and roll of the UAS, and will still be able to manipulate the flow controls as you see fit.

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Are Hylio’s drones autonomous?

Yes. Besides clicking “Take Off”, the UAS are completely autonomous. They will fly auto-generated waypoint missions, control flow-rate, monitor tank and battery levels, and return to their designated landing points all on their own. Agrosol has built-in features to ensure that the UAS which are operating simultaneously will not collide with one another.

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Does Hylio offer drone training?

Yes, training is a complimentary service that comes included with any purchase of a UAS. The majority of customers choose to utilize Hylio's remote (virtual) training program, but you also have the option to receive training in-person at our facility in Texas if you'd prefer that. The UAS are designed to be extremely easy to operate and maintain, it only takes a few hours to cover the basics. Besides standard operational training, our experts are happy to divulge as much of their personal UAS application experience as possible, which helps our customers further improve their farms and businesses.

Please check out out Purchasing Process page to learn more about the training that comes included with your AgroDrone purchase.

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Do the drones have FPV (first-person-view) cameras?

Yes. Each of our drones comes equipped with a 1080p live-streaming video feed by default. The video displays on a monitor that is built into the RC transmitter-controller. There is an optional upgrade available to outfit the drone with two FPV cameras in order to provide the operator with multiple perspectives when flying.

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What if there are trees/fences/powerlines/etc. on my property?

As mentioned in the "Do the drones have active obstacle avoidance?" question, the UAS has radars that actively detect and avoid collision with objects during flight.

The active obstacle avoidance radars are a great backup system, but obstacles should be digitally stored in the mission generation phase if possible to increase mission efficiency. Through this process, the UAS will automatically fly routes that avoid these marked obstacles. It is important to stay alert and exercise caution whenever the UAS are operating.

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Do the drones have RTK (real-time kinematic) Positioning?

Each of the UAS comes equipped with RTK compatible GPS modules by default. However, in order to utilize RTK, the user must also use a ground station unit that will send position correction data to the GPS on-board the UAS. Hylio offers these RTK ground stations as a separate, optional component to our UAS kits.

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How do I generate missions for the drones to fly?

Using our intuitive app interface, you will be able to easily draw shapes for the UAS to autonomously fly. We also provide a handheld GPS tracking device that you can use to digitally mark the edges of your lot, as well as obstacles within the field. Through Agrosol, you can control numerous mission parameters, including, but not limited to: altitude of flight, flow-rate, spray swath width, flight speed, and angle of flight. Uploading these missions to the UAS is a simple, one-click process.

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Is it difficult to control the drone(s)?

We designed our UAS for maximum usability. You do NOT have to be an expert drone pilot or engineer to operate our UAS effectively. For most people, regardless of background, it typically takes only one to two days of operating to get comfortable with the controls of our software and the UAS. Along with the UAS, we include manuals, checklists, and video tutorials that are concise and easy to follow. Additionally, you may always reach out to us at contact@hyl.io or by phone at 1-877-495- 4669 at any time for support. Our customers have told us it’s easier than they imagined, the UAS do fly themselves, after all.

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What happens if the drone crashes?

In most cases, a crashed UAS can be easily repaired by the operator (you) within the same day. We build them to last. Our UAS are designed to be repaired and maintained efficiently; as long as you have the right parts on hand, replacing them can be done with common tools, which are included in your purchase of the UAS. For more serious crashes, it may be necessary for a Hylio technician to visit your site for repairs, or you may need to send the UAS to one of our service locations. At Hylio, as service providers ourselves, we understand how frustrating UAS crashes can be. We are dedicated to resolving your problems as quickly and painlessly as possible so you can keep on working.

Drone Regulations

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Is it legal to fly and apply with your drones?

Absolutely! It is perfectly legal to fly and operate our UAS for application of chemicals as long as you obtain the proper licensing. In summary, you need three key licenses in order to utilize our UAS for applications: the FAA Part 107, the FAA Part 137, and a Pesticide Applicator License. To learn more about these licenses, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

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What licenses do I need to operate your spray drones?

There are three primary licenses that you need to operate our spray drones: the FAA Part 107, the FAA Part 137, and a Pesticide Applicator License. To learn more about these licenses, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

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Does Hylio help me get my licenses?

Absolutely! Hylio provides you with white-glove onboarding for the FAA Part 137 as a complimentary service along with your purchase of any of our UAS. Essentially, we do all of the work for you, you simply need to turn in the application documents to your local Flights Standards District Office (FSDO) and eventually FAA officials will visit you for an interview/test to finalize your application.

Hylio cannot directly help you with the FAA Part 107 or the Pesticide Applicator license because, by definition, you yourself need to test for and obtain those licenses. With that being said, we are more than happy to advise you on the process for obtaining those two licenses as best as we can based on our abundant experience with them.

To learn more about these licenses, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

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Where can I take my Pesticide Applicator License exam?

This varies state by state. Most states have several approved test centers where you can take this exam. You can use this link to find the relevant pesticide application license offices in your state.

As an example, Texas has 22 approved testing sites at the following locations: Abilene, Amarillo, Arlington, Austin (2), Corpus Christi, Dallas (2), El Paso, Fort Worth, Harlingen, Houston (4), Lubbock, McAllen, Midland, San Antonio (2), Tyler, Waco.

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How long does it take to get my licenses?

You are required to test for and obtain both the FAA Part 107 and Pesticide Applicator License (handled state by state) on your own. The FAA Part 137 does not involve a standardized test; instead it involves a significant amount of paperwork that you turn into the FAA and then a waiting period in which the FAA reviews your application.

FAA Part 107
For the FAA Part 107, the FAA recommends approximately 20 hours of studying in order to pass the exam. The exam is a a 60 question, multiple choice test that you have 120 minutes to complete. You must receive a minimum score of 70% to pass. Once you finish the test, your score is instantly tabulated and you receive a temporary license right there on the spot if you pass. You typically receive your hard-plastic license a few weeks later in the mail. In summary, you could study for and pass the Part 107 exam and have your license within a week.

Pesticide Applicator License
The Pesticide Applicator License exam varies somewhat state by state, but approximately 20-40 hours of study should be sufficient to prepare you to pass the exam. In most states, the test is composed of multiple-choice questions and you have 2-3 hours to complete it. In order to pass, you must receive a score of 70% or higher. Typically, you could study for and pass the Pesticide Applicator License exam within 1-2 weeks.

FAA Part 137
Hylio provides you with white-glove onboarding for the FAA Part 137 as a complimentary service along with your purchase of any of our UAS. Essentially, we do all of the work for you, you simply need to turn in the application documents to your local Flights Standards District Office (FSDO) and eventually FAA officials will visit you for an interview/test to finalize your application. The entire process from start to final approval can take several months. We have seen the process take as little as 2 months and as long as 12 months. Generally speaking, the sooner you start this, the better!

Summary
Out of the three licenses, the FAA Part 137 takes the longest. Bot the FAA Part 107 and the Pesticide Applicator license can be obtained within 2 weeks, but the FAA Part 137 can take anywhere from 2 - 12 months depending on a variety of factors.

To learn more about these licenses, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

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Where can I take my FAA Part 107 exam?

You can find an FAA-approved site near you on this website by clicking the "Find a Test Center" button.

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How much do the licenses cost?

FAA Part 107
The cost for the FAA Part 107 exam is $175.00. That is paid directly to the testing center when you go take your exam.

FAA Part 137
There is no government fee associated with applying for and obtaining a FAA Part 137 Certificate. Hylio provides you with white-glove onboarding for the FAA Part 137 as a complimentary service along with your purchase of any of our UAS. There are 3rd parties, such as aviation industry lawyers, who can assist you with filling your Part 137; their prices would vary from provider to provider but on average you can expect to pay more than $1,000.00 for such services.

Pesticide Applicator License
These fees vary state by state but typically the total you would pay in exam and registration fees would be somewhere between $100.00 and $200.00.

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Is it legal to fly multiple drones at once (i.e. “swarm” or “fleet” control)?

Yes. It is legal to fly multiple drones simultaneously as long as you obtain the proper licensing to do so. To learn more about the licenses that allow you to fly multiple drones, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

In summary: obtaining permission to fly multiple drones is done through an exemption process that is attached to your licenses with the FAA. Hylio is well versed with this process and we provide you with comprehensive assistance in acquiring the exemptions you seek for your operation.

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Is it legal to fly drones above 55 pounds?

Yes. It is legal to fly drones that exceed 55 pounds of take off weight as long as you obtain the proper licensing to do so. To learn more about the licenses that allow you to fly 55+ lb. drones, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

In summary: obtaining permission to fly 55+ lb. drones is done through an exemption process that is attached to your licenses with the FAA. Hylio is well versed with this process and we provide you with comprehensive assistance in acquiring the exemptions you seek for your operation.

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Do I need to be licensed even if I’m just spraying my own land?

Yes. In the government’s eyes, even spraying your own crops on land that you own is considered “commercial activity”; therefore you are still required to obtain an FAA Part 107, FAA Part 137, and a Pesticide Applicator License.

To learn more about these licenses, please visit our “FAA Licensing” page here.

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Which do I need, a ground or aerial pesticide applicators license?

Unfortunately the answer here is not black and white; the various, relevant governing bodies are still not completely on the same page about this. Some states have explicitly declared that you specifically need an aerial applicators license in order to operate spray drones; others don’t have explicit rulings on the topic yet and are (at least for the moment) allowing people to operate with either the ground or aerial pesticide applicators license.

Our advice would be that you should go ahead and obtain the aerial pesticide applicators license because we believe that will eventually be a standardized, legal requirement across all of the US.

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Is insurance required?

While neither the FAA Part 107 nor the FAA Part 137 explicitly require you to possess insurance, most states will require you to have liability insurance in order to obtain your pesticide applicator license. Thus, in effect, you are required to have some form of liability insurance in order to legally utilize our spray drones but the specific coverage needed may vary state by state.

Applications

Disclaimer

Hylio has been operating in the UAS agricultural application sector for several years. We employ licensed pesticide applicators and professional agronomists on our team and have drawn from their expertise and direct experiences in the field to offer the guidance posted below. With that being said, crop treatment practices can vary widely and depend on a number of factors including climate, region, crop, local laws and regulations, and more. You should always consult with a licensed agronomist and/or pesticide applicator in your state of operation before executing any crop treatment. Additionally, you should always consult the relevant government bodies before you begin pesticide application via UAS so that you are well informed of all of the regulations and laws governing the practice in your area. These government bodies can include, but are not limited to: your local FAA branch office (Flight Standards District Office), your state’s department of agriculture, and/or your county’s agricultural offices.

The advice contained within this FAQ is well established from Hylio’s and Hylio’s customers experiences spanning across several states and countries over several years. However, the advice below is not (and is not to be considered) formal legal counsel nor official agronomic recommendations. At the end of the day, it is your responsibility as the end user to determine whether or not your treatment plan is legal and technically sound.

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Is it legal to fly and apply with your drones?

Yes, it is perfectly legal to fly and apply with drones as long as you have the necessary licenses. Please visit our FAA Licensing page and/or our Regulations FAQ tab to learn more about the necessary licenses.

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I normally spray more than 10 gallons per acre (GPA) of total solution with my ground rig; how can drones be effective spraying as low as 1 or 2 GPA of solution?

With drones, you are able to safely spray much finer droplets than you would typically spray with traditional methods. These smaller droplets provide much better coverage and product efficacy.

With traditional methods (such as airplanes and ground rigs), you often must utilize coarse (325+ microns) or larger droplets because these devices do not have external methods for controlling drift; they must spray larger, heavier droplets and use drift control agents in an attempt to reduce their drift risk. The major disadvantage of this is that the larger your droplets are, the weaker your coverage is. As a general rule, smaller droplets (very fine > medium) offer better coverage and the only drawback to smaller droplets is that they are more susceptible to drift.

This is where drones come in. Drones have a great system for drift control: the downwash from the drones’ propellers provides 55-350+ pounds (depending on the model) of force to push those smaller droplets downward into the target area. Additionally, drones are precision tools that are able to fly much closer to the top of the crops than manned aerial applicators. The combination of this propeller downwash and the close proximity to the target area allows drones to safely spray very fine to medium droplets that provide much better coverage than their larger counterparts. Furthermore, the downwash has the added benefit of pushing away top layers of foliage so that these smaller droplets are able to penetrate to the bottom and middle of the crop. Whereas normally you may be worried that smaller drops could not penetrate well, the drones’ aerodynamic properties negate that issue.

In summary, while you are spraying less total solution volume by drone than you would with a normal spray rig, your smaller droplets actually end up giving you better coverage despite there being less liquid overall.

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What product labels do I use?

When spraying by drone, you should utilize the aerial application labels. There are many effective pesticides that have aerial labels that call for 1 - 3 GPA (gallons per acre) total solution volume. These are the ranges you should target when spraying by drone.

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I understand that I can lower the solution GPA rate, but can I use less chemical per acre as well?

The label is the law. We never advise any operator to deviate from the label’s instructions. You should apply the amount of chemical that the aerial label prescribes for the intended treatment; you should typically utilize the lowest amount of total solution that the label allows (usually 1 -3 GPA total solution volume). With that being said, we are hopeful that drone-specific labels will soon come out that explicitly allow applicators to apply not only less volume per acre overall but even less chemical volume per acre.

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Are there drone-specific chemical labels?

There are not yet any drone-specific chemical labels on the market but many organizations that hold Experimental Use Permits are currently conducting tests of drone applications at chemical rates that are lower than the traditional aerial label amounts. Many researchers believe that drones will allow applicators to apply less chemical per acre, but the industry is still awaiting official publishing of drone-specific labels.

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Are drone applications as effective as traditional applications?

Yes; in fact they can be much more effective than traditional applications when used properly.

With traditional methods (such as airplanes and ground rigs), you often must utilize coarse (325+ microns) or larger droplets because these devices do not have external methods for controlling drift; they must spray larger, heavier droplets and use drift control agents in an attempt to reduce their drift risk. The major disadvantage of this is that the larger your droplets are, the weaker your coverage is. As a general rule, smaller droplets (very fine > medium) offer better coverage and the only drawback to smaller droplets is that they are more susceptible to drift.

This is where drones come in. Drones have a great system for drift control: the downwash from the drones’ propellers provides more than 55-350+ pounds (depending on the model) of force to push those smaller droplets downward into the target area. Additionally, drones are precision tools that are able to fly much closer to the top of the crops than manned aerial applicators. The combination of this propeller downwash and the close proximity to the target area allows drones to safely spray very fine to medium droplets that provide much better coverage than their larger counterparts. Furthermore, the downwash has the added benefit of pushing away top layers of foliage so that these smaller droplets are able to penetrate to the bottom and middle of the crop. Whereas normally you may be worried that smaller drops could not penetrate well, the drones’ aerodynamic properties negate that issue.

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How do drone applications compare to ground rig applications?

With ground spraying rigs, you often must utilize coarse (325+ microns) or larger droplets because these devices do not have external methods for controlling drift; they must spray larger, heavier droplets and use drift control agents in an attempt to reduce their drift risk. The major disadvantage of this is that the larger your droplets are, the weaker your coverage is. As a general rule, smaller droplets (very fine to medium) offer better coverage and the only drawback to smaller droplets is that they are more susceptible to drift. Drones are able to safely spray much smaller droplets (in the very fine - medium range) which offer much better coverage than larger droplets. This allows drones to utilize far less solution than ground rigs when applying.

Ground rigs also have limited clearance height; even the majority of high-clearance boom sprayers on the market today max out at around 9 feet at the tallest. This can make spraying taller corn in mid to late season a challenge. Drones, on the other hand, can freely move in 3D space and thus can easily service crops of any height; from low sitting rice all the way to 20+ foot tree crops.

Ground rigs must trample some crop in order to service your lots. Research from Purdue demonstrated that yield loss due to wheel tracks accounted for anywhere from 0.8% to 6.7% of yield loss on soybean fields depending on the growth stage and the type of ground rig used. Drone applications avoid this yield loss since they simply fly over the crops to apply.

Ground rigs can also cause harmful soil compaction; especially ground rigs that are loaded with heavy liquid chemical loads. Soil compaction has been shown to possibly account for 10-20% of yield loss in unfavorable years. Drone applications avoid ground compaction since they simply fly over the crops to apply.

Drones, thanks to their propeller downwash, can penetrate the crop canopy much better than ground rigs. The downwash pushes away the top layers of foliage so that the smaller application droplets are able to penetrate to the bottom and middle of the crop. Whereas normally you may be worried that smaller drops could not penetrate well, the drones’ aerodynamic properties negate that issue. Ground rigs do not typically have any method for pushing the product down into the lower portions of the crop.

Ground rigs can have difficulty applying over terrain with elevation variations. Drones have no problem traversing over rising or falling slopes. Drones can easily fly over drainage ditches or protruding ground features that might be littered throughout your fields.

Ground rigs can have difficulty navigating irregular shaped or smaller fields. For example, a 120’ wide boom sprayer wouldn’t be able to spray a long, narrow lot that is thinner than 120’. A large ground rig would also have difficulty spraying corners, curves, and other strange shapes. Drones are able to spray any arbitrarily shaped area and they have adjustable effective swaths going from as thin as 6’ to as wide as 40’.Ground rigs cannot easily or safely navigate wet/muddy terrain. For example, flooded rice paddies are impassable by ground rigs. Also, when traditional row crops receive rain, they can often become impassable as well. This can be a compounded problem because many crop pests begin to grow and flourish immediately following a rain event so at the moment when you most need to go and treat your crops, you might not be able to with the ground rig that you have on hand. Drones don’t mind wet ground since they fly over the crops.

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How do drone applications compare to airplane applications?

Airplanes can carry much heavier payloads than our drones, but also have many disadvantages. Even though planes have a size advantage, deploying a fleet of our drones can allow a user to cover thousands of acres per day, as well.

Like ground rigs, airplanes do not have any method for pushing the product down into the lower portions of the crop. Therefore, when spraying smaller droplet sizes, they are at higher risk of the droplets drifting off target. Drones, conversely, have powerful propeller downwash which drives the droplets down into the target area. This downwash significantly mitigates the risk of drift when spraying finer droplets.

Airplanes cannot perform precision spray applications. By nature, and airplane performs fast moving sweeps over the crop with a typical effective swath width of ~60’ - 80’ (depending on the size of the aircraft); this means that even if the pilot tries to manually toggle the spray system on and off, the most precise application they could make would still hit at 2000+ sq. ft. Our drones, on the other hand, are precise enough to spray as small as a 5 sq. ft. area (depending on your nozzle configuration). This allows you to target individual spots or patches for treatment, reducing time and resources spent.

Airplanes also have great difficulty applying near tree lines, fence lines, power lines, and other common obstacles. Many airplane aerial applicators, for good reason, avoid applying too close to these obstacles which pose a crash risk for them. This results in either areas of the crop that are completely missed or areas that are inconsistently sprayed. For example, as a pilot banks upwards at the edge of a field in order to clear the tree line, their elevation is increasing which is negatively affecting the deposition of the product.

Airplanes are much more expensive to acquire (both through purchase or leasing), maintain, and operate. Thus, airplane applicators have a much higher barrier to entry and are hit with high operating expenses. Typically, this forces the airplane aerial applicators to avoid spraying smaller lots entirely or to enforce minimum payment amounts (per flight, per day, etc.). For farmers, this can make contracting of airplane applicators prohibitively expensive, especially if you are a farmer with smaller, scattered lots. Drones, conversely, are much cheaper to purchase, maintain, and operate. Even a fleet of drones is more affordable than an airplane for aerial applications on both the front and back end.

Finally, it’s an unfortunate reality that application by airplane is fairly dangerous. Every year there are several deaths and injuries associated with airplane applications. The drones, by nature, expose operators/pilots to much less danger. In the rare event that a drone crashes, typically the extent of the damage is limited to the drone and a few stalks of corn. By utilizing drones, aerial applicators can perform their treatments cheaper, safer, and more precisely; creating value for both themselves and the farmer receiving the services.

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How do drone applications compare to helicopter applications?

Most helicopters used for aerial application actually don’t have a major capacity advantage over drones. Typically, application helicopters have anywhere from 20-60 gallons of effective payload, whereas our largest drone at the moment can carry a 7.2 gallon capacity. Thus, by deploying just three or four of our drones, you can already begin directly competing with the capacity being put out by a helicopter.

Helicopters share the propeller downwash advantage that drones have. In many ways, the aerodynamics of a helicopter application are similar to a drone application. Both utilize the downwash to drive smaller droplets down into the target area, mitigating the risk of drift.

Although they can handle it somewhat better than airplanes, helicopters still experience difficulty applying near tree lines, fence lines, power lines, and other common obstacles. Many helicopter applicators, for good reason, avoid applying too close to these obstacles which pose a crash risk for them. This results in either areas of the crop that are completely missed or areas that are inconsistently sprayed. For example, as a pilot banks upwards at the edge of a field in order to clear the tree line, their elevation is increasing which is negatively affecting the deposition of the product.

Helicopters are more precise than airplanes, but they are still much less precise than drones. Typically, helicopters perform sweeping applications (similar to airplanes), but they are able to hover and target areas that are smaller than the whole field. With that being said, the most precise a helicopter can get is typically a 100+ sq. ft. area due to their boom configuration. Additionally, targeting multiple small spots within a field in a manually piloted helicopter can be a very tedious task and is prone to human error. On the other hand, drones are precise enough to spray as small as a 5 sq. ft. area. (depending on your nozzle configuration). This allows you to target individual spots or patches for treatment, reducing time and resources spent. Unlike the manually piloted helicopter, the drone can be programmed to target as many spots as you want and it will go out and autonomously handle that with precision and efficiency.

Like airplanes, helicopters are much more expensive to acquire, maintain, and operate. Thus, helicopter applicators have a much higher barrier to entry and are hit with high operating expenses. Typically, this forces the helicopter aerial applicators to avoid spraying smaller lots entirely or to enforce minimum payment amounts (per flight, per day, etc.). For farmers, this can make contracting of helicopter applicators prohibitively expensive, especially if you are a farmer with smaller, scattered lots. Drones, conversely, are much cheaper to purchase, maintain, and operate. Even a fleet of drones is more affordable than a helicopter for aerial applications on both the front and back end.

Unfortunately, helicopter applications, like airplane applications, are fairly dangerous. Every year there are several deaths and injuries associated with helicopter applications. The drones, by nature, expose operators/pilots to much less danger. In the rare event that a drone crashes, typically the extent of the damage is limited to the drone and a few stalks of corn. By utilizing drones, aerial applicators can perform their treatments cheaper, safer, and more precisely; creating value for both themselves and the farmer receiving the services.

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Should I be worried about drift?

It depends. If the product label calls for you to utilize drift control agents, then you should do so. Other than that, you should utilize drift control agents if the situation calls for it. Oftentimes the drone’s downwash alone is enough for you to have effective drift control. However, in some conditions you might want to consider adding a drift control agent. To give a few examples: drift control agents can be useful if you’re flying higher than usual (perhaps to apply over hilly terrain), or if there is more crosswind than usual.

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What is the liquid capacity of the drone?

We currently offer four drone models:
AG-110: 2.7 gallons (10 liters)
AG-116: 4.2 gallons (16 liters)
AG-122: 5.2 gallons (20 liters)
AG-130: 7.2 gallons (27 liters)

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Can I broadcast spray?

Yes, using our AgroSol software, you can easily define a boundary for the drone(s) to spray as a broadcast application. You can define key parameters such as application altitude, swath width, desired dosage, and more to achieve the exact application quality you want.

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What crops can I spray with drones?

At this point, Hylio’s drones have been used to successfully spray virtually all crop types; from staple row crops such as corn and soybeans to specialty crops such as berries, citrus fruits, and tomatoes. Hylio’s drones are also used for non-ag purposes such as weed control for municipalities and energy companies as well as mosquito control.

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Can I spot spray?

Yes, using our AgroSol software you can target both areas and individual points to spot spray. You can either define these within AgroSol itself using our map interface, or you can import these from virtually any GIS/ag-scouting 3rd party program (such as MyJohnDeere, Ag Leader, Climate FieldView, DroneDeploy, Pix4D, etc.) Once these points/areas are defined, you can then assign them to a Hylio spray drone which can treat them autonomously.

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Can I spray an A-B Line?

Yes, using our AgroSol software, you can define any arbitrary line that you would like for the drone to spray. This could be a straight A-B line, a curved line, or a very complicated line with many twists and turns; it’s up to you.

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Can I do variable rate spraying?

Yes. Thanks to the precision of Hylio’s AgroDrones, you can apply products only where your crops need them without needlessly over-spraying in other areas. We have a variety of different spray modes that allow you perform variable rate operations which include: spot spraying, multiple area spraying, and zonation spraying based off of prescriptions. The electronic flowmeters aboard the AgroDrones allow the aircraft to automatically adjust their spraying mid-flight to achieve precise, variable rate goals.

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Will the spray drones identify weeds, do crop population counts, etc.?

While Hylio itself does not create crop scouting drones, our platform works very well with many 3rd party crop scouting systems. You can utilize popular platforms such as DroneDeploy and Pix4D to perform crop scouting tasks (such as stand counts and NDVI crop health scans).

It is easy to export prescription maps from these 3rd parties into Hylio’s AgroSol software. With these maps, you can perform data-driven, precision application of chemicals.

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Can I mix and apply multiple chemicals at the same time?

Yes. It’s quite common to mix application chemicals with drift control agents such as MSO, for example. You can also mix multiple different pesticide products together, but you must follow the labels (label is the law!), and you need to be mindful of the viscosity of the mixture. Some products don’t mix well together and can create a thick, gluey substance that may not be able to pass through the drone’s spray system. The vast majority of products that are mixed and applied aerially by planes/helicopters would also work when mixed and applied with our drones.

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Can the drones spread granular products?

Yes. All of our models are compatible with optional granular spreader devices which you can purchase from us. The granular spreader device is an automated, rotary device that can be used to apply a wide variety of solid material products such as fertilizers, pesticides, and seeds. You can learn more about the spreader devices on our accessories page.

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Can the same drone do both liquid and solid material applications?

Yes. All of our models are compatible with optional granular spreader devices which you can purchase from us. The process to switch between the liquid and solid payload equipment typically takes 30 - 60 minutes and involves dismounting one set of equipment and mounting the other using standard fasteners.

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What is the granular capacity of the drone?

AG-110: 2.7 gallons (10 liters)
AG-116: 2.7 gallons (10 liters)
AG-122: 5.2 gallons (20 liters)
AG-130: 5.2 gallons (20 liters)

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How long does it take to empty your tank?

In a typical application flight, the drone will completely empty its payload within 5-10 minutes depending on your application settings.

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Do the drones have automated flow tracking and adjustment?

Yes. The drones have electronic flowmeters that track material flow from the drone. These flowmeters are integrated into the drones’ onboard computers and are also synced up with our AgroSol software; this allows the drones to automatically adjust their flowrate with control loops in real-time to ensure consistent applications. In dynamic flowrate mode, you simply define a solution dosage rate per area that you wish to hit (2 gallons/acre, for example) and the drones systems will coordinate to maintain that target dosage. When the drone decelerates coming into a transition, the pump will decrease flowrate in order to avoid over spraying and vice-versa.

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How accurate is the flowmeter?

The flowmeters we utilize, when properly calibrated, have a margin of error of approximately 2%.

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Do the drones know when they run out of payload?

Yes. The drones have electronic flowmeter sensors which can detect when material has stopped flowing. In this way, the drones know when they run out of material and they will then automatically return to your designated land point for refilling.

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Do the drones know where they stopped spraying?

Yes. If the drones have to return to home mid-application (low battery, ran out of material, etc.), then they automatically store the last point where they applied and will resume at that point once you send them back out. This checkpoint is shown on our AgroSol interface while you’re operating.

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How high should I fly above the crops when I’m applying?

This depends on the intended goals of your application. Usually we recommend a spray altitude of 12-15 foot above the crops which results in an optimal effective swath that balances coverage with width. There are instances where you might want to fly lower, or higher, in order to optimize your application. For example, you could fly lower than 12-15 feet in order to reduce your swath width so you can spray a narrower ditch.

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How fast should I fly when I’m applying?

This depends on the intended goals of your application. Generally speaking, we recommend that you fly as fast as possible while still keeping up with the intended dosage rate; the faster you fly, the more productive you will be in terms of acres treated per hour/day/etc.

To clarify, if you would like to target a 2GPA dosage rate for your application, there is a maximum speed at which you can fly where your pumps will still be able to maintain that dosage. AgroSol has a built-in calculator that will determine what that maximum speed is for the model you are using and the dosage you are trying to achieve. As an example, the AG-130 can apply at a rate of 2 GPA while flying at a maximum of ~20 mph. Therefore, it would be optimal for you to fly at 20 mph with the AG-130 when targeting a 2 GPA dosage.

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What is the effective swath width of the drones?

AG-110: Up to 20 feet (6.1 meters)
AG-116: Up to 25 feet (7.6 meters)
AG-122: Up to 30 feet (9.1 meters)
AG-130: Up to 35 feet (10.7 meters)

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How do I adjust the effective swath width of the drones?

There are several parameters that affect the effective swath width of the drones:

Spray Altitude
Generally speaking, increasing your spray altitude will increase your effective spray width. We recommend a spray altitude of 12-15 foot above the crops which results in an optimal effective swath that balances coverage and width.

For example, an AgroDrone spraying at 15 feet above the crop will have a wider effective swath than one spraying with similar spray settings except at an altitude of 5 feet above the crop.

Spray Speed
By decreasing your spray speed, you will increase your effective swath width. If the drone has more time to linger over a certain area while spraying, the downwash pattern will widen the swath that you’re putting down. For example, an AgroDrone spraying at a 2GPA rate flying at 10 mph will have a wider effective swath than one spraying at the same rate but flying at 20 mph.

Flowrate / Nozzle Selection
By increasing your flowrate, you can boost your effective swath width. For example, an AgroDrone flying at 20mph and spraying at 2 GPA rate will have a wider effective swath than one flying at the same speed but spraying at 1 GPA.

Nozzle selection will dictate your flowrate and thus affect your swath width as described above.

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What is the thinnest swath that I can spray?

By adjusting the nozzle configuration and the altitude of application, the operator can reduce their swath to approximately 6 feet in width. This can be useful for spraying thinner test plot rows, fence lines, ditches, etc.

The nozzle configurations on the AgroDrones are fully customizable in terms of nozzle tip and physical placement; you can even set up the AgroDrones to only have a single, central spraying point which could be used to spray individual plants. This can bring your spray area down to a 3 sq. ft. or less depending on your nozzle selection.

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What products can I effectively spray by drone?

You can effectively spray most commercially available products by drone. This includes herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, larvicides, micronutrients, fertilizers, biologicals, and more. You can effectively apply both systemic and contact products.

We generally don’t recommend that people utilize our AgroDrones for extensive NPK fertilizer applications; typically you would apply several hundred pounds of these fertilizers per acre and given the drones’ payload capabilities, they are not well suited for this application. However, if you only need to treat a relatively small amount of acreage, then the AgroDrones may still be a practical option for these relatively heavy fertilizer applications.

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What type of nozzles should I use?

This depends on the intended goals of your application. By default, we send out our AgroDrones equipped with GreenLeaf Airmix TipGuard nozzle tips (AMTGST 015). These tips typically produce droplets in the fine to medium range (145 to 325 microns); this is usually effective for most applications done by drone. There may be more unique cases where you would opt for either smaller or bigger droplets.

You can easily switch out the nozzle tips with nozzle tips of your choosing. The AgroDrones are compatible with most TeeJet style nozzle tips which feature a hand twist-on, twist-off installation method for easy swapping right there in the field.

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What droplet size should I use?

This depends on the intended goals of your application. Generally speaking, droplets in the fine-medium range (145 - 325 microns) are optimal for many applications made via drones. You want to utilize smaller droplets than you typically would with traditional application equipment; these smaller droplets allow the drones to provide great coverage and efficacy at lower solution rates. However, you would usually avoid using droplets that are very fine, or smaller (< 145 microns) because those pose a higher risk of drift. Please view the chart for general guidelines on nozzle size selection for different application goals. Remember, the label is the law!

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What pressure do the pumps run at?

The pumps generate a maximum of 65 psi of pressure.

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Does your software create spray reports (as-applied maps)?

Yes. Our software, AgroSol, tracks every application that you make. These spray reports are available in the “Reports” tab of our AgroSol software. These reports are not automatically sent to any 3rd party; they are stored within your account and you can use them however you see fit.

These reports detail important information such as: time stamps, crop treated, targeted pest, chemical products utilized and at what rates, area treated, volume of solution applied, operator information, customer information (if applicable), speed, altitude, and more. These reports streamline administrative tasks such as invoicing and compliance reporting with the EPA and FAA.

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How do I keep track of my applications for compliance reporting?

AgroSol has built-in data logging and reporting features to streamline your compliance requirements. AgroSol tracks every application that you make. These spray reports are available in the “Reports” tab of our AgroSol software. These reports are not automatically sent to any 3rd party; they are stored within your account and you can use them however you see fit.

These reports detail important information such as: time stamps, crop treated, targeted pest, chemical products utilized and at what rates, area treated, volume of solution applied, operator information, customer information (if applicable), speed, altitude, and more. These reports streamline administrative tasks such as invoicing and compliance reporting with the EPA and FAA.

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How do I refill the drones?

You’re free to utilize whatever system works best for you. The majority of Hylio customers prefer to use fill-rite style nozzles coupled with transfer pumps in the 15-30 GPM range to fill their Hylio drones up directly when they land. Typically you would run this pump directly from a “hot tank” that contains your chemical solution.

Additionally, on the AG-122 model specifically, you have the option of “hot-swapping” the liquid tanks. This means that you can simply pull out the previously-used tanks by hand and drop in new, pre-loaded ones within a matter of seconds.

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Do I need to keep the chemical agitated in the drone tank?

Generally speaking, no. We would recommend having some sort of agitation system in your hot tank, but since the drones typically dump their full payload in 5-8 minutes, you usually don’t have to worry about the chemical settling while it is in the drones’ tanks as long as you are not spending too much time on the ground in-between flights.

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What trailer set-up do you recommend?

This varies depending on your operational needs. If you have just one drone, you can simply utilize a pickup truck towing a relatively small carry-on/utility trailer (approx. 5’ x 8’). Between the pickup’s bed and the trailer, you can typically haul all of the equipment you need for a lean, rapid deployment operation. This equipment would include: a water tote (perhaps 100-200 gallons), a “hot” tank (where your solution is mixed, approx. 100 gallons), a generator (typically 5 - 10KW), chargers, batteries, and auxiliary equipment (ground station, tools, PPE, etc.)

If you have a multiple-drone operation, we would suggest utilizing a larger trailer (approx. 8’ x 14’ - 20’ range) in order to have enough room to carry multiple drones, larger water and chemical tanks, and more chargers and batteries.

For planning transportation, you can find spec sheets showing the dimensions of the various AgroDrone models here:
AG-110 Spec Sheet
AG-116 Spec Sheet 
AG-122 Spec Sheet
AG-130 Spec Sheet

Generally speaking, using an enclosed trailer is optimal so that the electronic components (primarily chargers and batteries) are protected from the sun, rain, and other elements. The batteries will charge faster and more healthily at lower temperatures; having the batteries in shade helps prevent overheating. Additionally, implementing some sort of active cooling system can decrease charge times and increase battery lifespan; even just fans moving air over the charging batteries can help significantly, but a climate controlled (air conditioned) charging area is even better.

Check out this video of a Hylio customer’s trailer set up to see a great example of a convenient, efficient arrangement.

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